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Blue Wall

Blue Wall

This edition is an ode to post election stress relief, creating a “blue wall” to mark the changing of the guard with feelings of hope, optimism, with liberty & justice for all.

Behind Judgement

$700

Bergy Bits

$88 /mo | $1,950 Purchase

Coast Landscape

$38 /mo | $760 Purchase

Cerulean Conception

$5,000 /mo | $5,000 Purchase

Embryonic Stage 5

$38 /mo | $320 Purchase

Eruption

$38 /mo | $500 Purchase

A painting that moves...

$88 /mo | $1,350 Purchase

Primeras lluvias de mayo...

$348 /mo | $6,000 Purchase

Composition No. 180

$88 /mo | $1,800 Purchase

Point of View

$148 /mo | $5,000 Purchase

<3

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

160 Beaumont Street, October...

$38 /mo | $350 Purchase

Topaz

$38 /mo | $700 Purchase

5 Eggslike

$2,000

Aditya Oceen

$148 /mo | $4,900 Purchase

Agency

$88 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Blue Year

$4,500

Untitled

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

  • Corey Lovett

    Corey Lovett is a Brooklyn based artist and is currently pursuing a BFA degree in Painting at Pratt Institute. Corey paints images to evoke a feeling or mood within the viewer. His work is a combination of both abstract and figurative representation.

  • Debbi Kenote

    Debbi's works are sneaky in a sense that, instead of denying the existence of a frame, they subtly push against and peak out from it (have you noticed the pairs of eyes in some of her paintings?) Neat square pieces on the outer boundaries of the frame devolve into patterns, curves, and patches of sprayed paint. Some of Debbi's paintings actually look like puzzles, challenging you to play an active role - only to reveal that, in the end, her puzzles yield fun for the sake of it rather than a finished picture.

  • Jadie Meprivert

    In her work and in her life, Jadie strives to educate, inspire, and uplift others. Her work reflects her passion for fostering human relations and connection, inspired by connections made not only through her pursuit of visual art but through dance and her work as a vocalist and actor. Jadie’s loose, colorful brushstroke places those concepts on canvas, creating warm imagery that links to the divine and human nature as a whole.

  • Eric Jiaju Lee

    Eric Jiaju Lee does a little bit of everything. He's an abstract painter, musician, sculptor, photographer, performance artist, and rock climber. It is no surprise, then, that his nature-inspired paintings are informed by movement. The fluid calligraphic gestures of Chinese ink and brush and tai chi can be seen in his abstract works as he pours, puddles, and tips his way towards representing the feeling of nature.

  • Johanna Ryan

    What if we saw nature not as distinguishable things like trees, mountains, and soil, but as a cloud of influences that surround us? Harkening back to her memories growing up in nature and a personal interest in Ecofeminism, Johanna's method of printmaking is in itself a dialogue with nature. In cyanotypes, the intentional outlines of base drawings intermingle with spontaneous factors like the angle, brightness, and hue of sunlight - even the canvas it is printed on is candidly frayed at the edges. In her other prints also, watercolor-like effects make even the ground appear buoyant.

  • Noriko Okada

    Noriko Okada’s works are like siblings who look nothing alike. They’re like third cousins; like twins separated at birth; like people who you could have sworn were only children: each work is singular, but is related by a thread that runs deep yet just out of sight. Her amalgamous artworks of paint, fabric, prints, and ceramic don’t shout their message out loud, but invite viewers in for a chat.

  • Lauren Orscheln

    Seeing Lauren's large unstretched canvas as it hangs in the golden hour light is a poetic experience. As she brings out the canvases one by one and unrolls them, you can tell that she has a story to tell for each and every one. Then the shadows and ripples of the canvas blends in with the scribbles and stains of watercolor, the intensity of golden hour blurring outlines of objects. Also notice how she leaves graphite sketches underneath the paint. They are residues of time, the same way Lauren's paintings are footprints of memories and impressions.

  • Juan Negroni

    Sometimes, a feeling, story, or place are so intricately colorful it’s impossible to describe them in words. Sometimes, all three exist at once. This is certainly the case for Juan Negroni, who’s mixed media paintings map out memories and spaces in the abstract, playing with colors and motifs that pay homage to his home; Puerto Rico. Now based in Texas, Juan takes us up close to a vibrant garden where overlapping neon colored plants and patterns make nature itself seem dull.

  • Raul Ortiz

    If you’ve ever seen a sunflower that’s seemed to mutate and stretch in all directions (gardeners call it fasciation), you’ll recognise that odd, abstract beauty in nature that shines in Raúl Ortiz’s paintings. Raúl’s paintings strip away sections to reveal even more colorfully patterned silhouettes. Though his earlier works took the shape of natural subjects like flowers, more indistinct shapes take center stage, playing with repetition as well as vivid color.

  • Esteban Jimenez Guerra

    History always has a funny way of catching up to us, Guerra seems to make sure of that. The historical context that he intimately experienced in Cuba and in the diversity of New York City is mixed with the now, giving the viewers the constant message that liberation starts from the body. Gender stereotypes along with racial stereotypes that are perpetuated by long standing societal structures are also taken for a fresh spin, while playing with its past meanings.

  • Gabriella Moreno

    Have you ever looked at a portrait and felt as if it was looking right back at you? Gabriella Moreno explores this power dynamic, not through piercing eye contact, but through reclining nudes and unconventional materials that question negotiations of power in sexual contexts. Femme central subjects are painted on silk and satin instead of the traditional canvas. Materials used for bedding and clothing combine the potential intimacy of their traditional uses with poses that empower the sitter. In her paintings, strength and softness induce each other and reflect back on you through the sheen of the stretched silk and satin.

  • Katie Hector

    Katie’s mixed-media paintings burst out from two-dimensional space in smears of concrete and swirls of neon color. After the first three seconds of trying to identify an object and failing, you’ll be inclined to smell, touch, and listen to these sites left behind by some mysterious encounter. Are the two circular marks in Katie’s FOMO series dinosaur footprints or the result of someone angrily punching at a slab of clay (my friend who makes ceramics does this…)? Prehistoric or Gen-Z? Wild moss or silica gel beads? Pools of magma or ketchup and mustard? You tell me.

  • Shira Toren

    There is a sense of history in Shira's paintings. They are built up patiently like the hands of potters that their surfaces resemble, but left to be scratched and marked by some unknown force. Even the central objects are pressed into the thick layer of venetian plaster instead of sitting on top. In a world of polished surfaces, Shira's use of materials restores the power of time.

  • Philippe Halaburda

    Philippe calls his paintings “geographical abstractions”. He reconstructs recognizable details of an urban environment (angular shapes that look like construction debris or suggestion of skyscrapers, for example) according to his personal impression of pecific locations like New York, Aix-en-Provence, and Zurich. But Philippe doesn’t try to organize everything - where everything is fast, noisy, smelly, and overall so extra-, you gotta lean into the chaos and learn how to enjoy it.

  • Ryan Sarah Murphy

    Ryan transforms the cardboards you may throw away without much thought into colorful architectural miniatures. Despite the playful variation in depth, form, and color, the parts in her reliefs magically fit together. Does that remind you of anything? I’m thinking New York City’s way of combining like 10 different eras in one block.

  • Evan Peltzman

    Evan Peltzman is a visual artist working and living in New York, NY. He believes in celebrating the ridiculous. There lives a reassuring humor within humanity that is often drowned out by the negative. He believes that humor and negativity are created by the same force, the most prolifically ridiculous trait of them all- insecurity.

  • Robin Kang

    Robin Kang is a Brooklyn-based artist, educator, and student of ancient mystical lineages. Her art reinterprets the tradition of weaving within a contemporary technological context. Utilizing a digitally operated Jacquard hand loom, the contemporary version of the first binary operated machine and argued precursor to the invention of the computer, she hand weaves tapestries that combine mythic symbolism, computer related imagery, and digital mark making. The juxtaposition of textiles with electronics opens conversations of reconciling old traditions with new possibilities, as well as the relationship between textiles, symbols, language, memory and spirituality.

  • Christina Massey

    Christina's mixed-media works are engaged in a perpetual struggle to burst out of whatever shape that holds them together. A philosopher once said that any artwork is a battle between material and content - this cannot be truer when Christina uses fabric like khakis, linen, and yarn that usually function to clothe and decorate our bodies but in her works given freedom to emanate energy on their own. In a sense, her approach seems like a rebellion against the way we in the modern times tend to bend nature as an object of our own use. When given the smallest crevice, nature will re-emerge in its full majestic force.

  • Sunny Chapman

    Sunny Chapman is an artist living in New York City. Sunny was a jewelry designer for 25 years, starting as an artisan jeweler selling at craft shows, art galleries and museum shops, then moving into the fashion world and selling at Barneys, Saks, etc. Having to interpret different ideas and create five new lines of jewelry a year was good training for the varied way she works, from intricate line drawings to pieces with large simple geometric shapes and bold colors.

  • Tyler Sorgman

    Tyler Sorgman is interested in exploring how the landscape can act as a symbol for the psychological. Sorgman’s recent work includes imagery of plant growth, mountain ranges, storms, and forest fires. A solitary home is often set into these imagined spaces. The scenes Sorgman creates are meant to feel both playful yet perilous; dreamy yet uneasy. Throughout Sorgman’s body of work, there is a play between flatness, depth, and the simplification of complex forms. He builds up layers of paint through repetitive marks and symbols, and sees their accumulation as a reflection of his thoughts, feelings, and anxieties at the time of each individual work’s creation.

  • James Kane

    At its core, James' work is about intimacy. His sexual identity and personal relationships form a prism, through which the content of his paintings bend and refract as they examine intimacy between strangers. People on the street, the subway, and couples sharing private moments in public are all viewed from a queer stance to ask questions about loneliness, contact, and communication. By combining collected images and personal experiences, James creates composite sketches that repurpose the initial encounters captured in them.

  • Warner Ball

    Warner Ball is a Michigan-based artist and graduate of Albion College, where he graduated with a focus in photography. Warner is a curator, as well as an artist, and enjoys coordinating meaningful collections of work that explore important topics like climate and identity. He employs a number of media, including photography and sculpture, to explore queerness and domesticity, the major conceptual foundation of his work for the past few years.

  • Shyun Song

    Shyun's minimalism does the maximum in bringing out the intensity of shapes and colors. What seem like stable forms - rectangles, tubes, and lines - never sit quietly on the ground. Shyun tips these shapes on their corner, drops them over a shadow, and slices just a little of their edges like soft cheese, capturing the brief moment where the stability of geometry meets the imagination of our eyes.

  • Adam Blaustein Rejto

    Adam Blaustein Rejto paints lyrical and narrative dreams that weave personal and familial memories with reimagined and reconstructed scenes. Their paintings aspire to heal their own and their family’s grief-related traumas through loving attention. Blaustein Rejto depicts their pain and heartbreak while expressing how it is also the origin of their joy and pleasure. A formally trained chemist, and now paint-maker and pigment forager, Blaustein Rejto operates Catskill Paints, producing, researching, and merchandising foraged pigments and oil paints.

  • Petra Nimtz

    Petra Nimtz rarely works on just one piece at a time; applying the next layer before the last has dried, she composes pieces with both care and spontaneity. Petra paints bold gestures, spreading the newest streak of paint with a brush, palette knife, and even her hands to create semi-translucent layers that distinguish each stroke as their own unique statement. Her large scale, earth toned works are resolutely abstract. The bold composition is the star of the artworks, creating a feeling that is as grounded as it is exciting.

  • Camilla Webster

    Camilla Webster is not only a painter, but a best selling author and TED speaker whose creative enterprises have led her to success in many disciplines. Her artwork floats emotions and themes of current events in her emphatic abstractions. Camilla’s painterly style is guided by her previous work as a writer, evoking a narrative discourse within the textural lines of her body of work.

  • Joe Piscopia

    Joe Piscopia builds 3D shapes with 2D mediums. Informed by strongly contrasted lighting, Joe’s gradations bring every object, concept, or pattern to life in abstract forms. Shapes and colors document moments of thought and emotion in Joe’s life. Starting with a thought, a bird, or a single word, he intuitively explores from there into a realm of soft geometry.

  • Marco DaSilva

    Marco DaSilva is a Brazilian-American artist whose symbol-based works explore hybridity through the intersections of painting and craft. His graphic style of making combines painting and collaging of objects, textures and mediums. His works use bright bold colors that investigate ritual and storytelling through a queer lens. He creates his own mythology in the process, providing a richly saturated landscape of his own world to the viewer.

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