⭐️ Shop art under $100! ⭐️
Blue Wall

Blue Wall

This edition is an ode to post election stress relief, creating a “blue wall” to mark the changing of the guard with feelings of hope, optimism, with liberty & justice for all.

Behind Judgement

$700 Unframed | $912 Framed

Coast Landscape

$38 /mo | $760 Purchase

Eruption

$38 /mo | $500 Purchase

A painting that moves...

$88 /mo | $1,350 Purchase

Composition No. 180

$88 /mo | $1,800 Purchase

Point of View

$148 /mo | $5,000 Purchase

160 Beaumont Street, October...

$38 /mo | $350 Purchase

Aditya Oceen

$148 /mo | $4,900 Purchase

Agency

$88 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Untitled

$88 /mo | $800 Purchase

Blue Diamond Transistor

$148 /mo | $2,500 Purchase

Eyes to See the...

$148 /mo | $3,000 Purchase

String Circuit

$148 /mo | $3,500 Purchase

Sky Dust

$148 /mo | $3,500 Purchase

Crystal Currents

$148 /mo | $3,500 Purchase

Space Shower

$38 /mo | $288 Purchase

Safe House II

$500 Unframed

Untitled crush

$320 Unframed

  • Corey Lovett

    Corey Lovett is a Brooklyn based artist and is currently pursuing a BFA degree in Painting at Pratt Institute. Corey paints images to evoke a feeling or mood within the viewer. His work is a combination of both abstract and figurative representation.

  • Jadie Meprivert

    In her work and in her life, Jadie strives to educate, inspire, and uplift others. Her work reflects her passion for fostering human relations and connection, inspired by connections made not only through her pursuit of visual art but through dance and her work as a vocalist and actor. Jadie’s loose, colorful brushstroke places those concepts on canvas, creating warm imagery that links to the divine and human nature as a whole.

  • Noriko Okada

    Noriko Okada’s works are like siblings who look nothing alike. They’re like third cousins; like twins separated at birth; like people who you could have sworn were only children: each work is singular, but is related by a thread that runs deep yet just out of sight. Her amalgamous artworks of paint, fabric, prints, and ceramic don’t shout their message out loud, but invite viewers in for a chat.

  • Lauren Orscheln

    Seeing Lauren's large unstretched canvas as it hangs in the golden hour light is a poetic experience. As she brings out the canvases one by one and unrolls them, you can tell that she has a story to tell for each and every one. Then the shadows and ripples of the canvas blends in with the scribbles and stains of watercolor, the intensity of golden hour blurring outlines of objects. Also notice how she leaves graphite sketches underneath the paint. They are residues of time, the same way Lauren's paintings are footprints of memories and impressions.

  • Raul Ortiz

    If you’ve ever seen a sunflower that’s seemed to mutate and stretch in all directions (gardeners call it fasciation), you’ll recognise that odd, abstract beauty in nature that shines in Raúl Ortiz’s paintings. Raúl’s paintings strip away sections to reveal even more colorfully patterned silhouettes. Though his earlier works took the shape of natural subjects like flowers, more indistinct shapes take center stage, playing with repetition as well as vivid color.

  • Esteban Jimenez Guerra

    History always has a funny way of catching up to us, Guerra seems to make sure of that. The historical context that he intimately experienced in Cuba and in the diversity of New York City is mixed with the now, giving the viewers the constant message that liberation starts from the body. Gender stereotypes along with racial stereotypes that are perpetuated by long standing societal structures are also taken for a fresh spin, while playing with its past meanings.

  • Michelle Selwa

    Michelle Selwa is an artist and Brooklyn native currently based in New York City. Her work explores the ways technology affects our relationship with images and memory, and the anxiety of archiving images from rapidly degrading mediums.

  • Philippe Halaburda

    Philippe calls his paintings “geographical abstractions”. He reconstructs recognizable details of an urban environment (angular shapes that look like construction debris or suggestion of skyscrapers, for example) according to his personal impression of pecific locations like New York, Aix-en-Provence, and Zurich. But Philippe doesn’t try to organize everything - where everything is fast, noisy, smelly, and overall so extra-, you gotta lean into the chaos and learn how to enjoy it.

  • Ryan Sarah Murphy

    Ryan transforms the cardboards you may throw away without much thought into colorful architectural miniatures. Despite the playful variation in depth, form, and color, the parts in her reliefs magically fit together. Does that remind you of anything? I’m thinking New York City’s way of combining like 10 different eras in one block.

  • Evan Peltzman

    I started making art in my early childhood, heavily influenced by the illustration work within the surf, skate and live music scenes of the 80’s and 90’s. As a young adult, I gravitated towards fine art through my exploration of less traditional media and application. After some years of working in abstraction, I’ve re-introduced representational imagery into my work. The goal is to join the worlds of abstraction and illustration to create a space in between where my work can continue to grow.

  • Robin Kang

    Robin Kang is a Brooklyn-based artist, educator, and student of ancient mystical lineages. Her art reinterprets the tradition of weaving within a contemporary technological context. Utilizing a digitally operated Jacquard hand loom, the contemporary version of the first binary operated machine and argued precursor to the invention of the computer, she hand weaves tapestries that combine mythic symbolism, computer related imagery, and digital mark making. The juxtaposition of textiles with electronics opens conversations of reconciling old traditions with new possibilities, as well as the relationship between textiles, symbols, language, memory and spirituality.

  • Sunny Chapman

    Sunny Chapman retired from performing as a singer, & dancer, designing jewelry for stores like Barneys and Saks, activism and making documentaries to make art, a little jewelry and occasional poetry in Brooklyn and the Catskills. She was a street artist whose character Flower Face was published in the book Brooklyn Street Art. She resides in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and in the Catskills. Chapman's studio art has been widely shown in galleries largely in the Northeast. Her art and poetry are published in books as well, her documentaries about Crisis Pregnancy Centers are distributed by The Cinema Guild. She is also the curator of the Birdhouse Gallery.

  • Tyler Sorgman

    Tyler Sorgman is interested in exploring how the landscape can act as a symbol for the psychological. Sorgman’s recent work includes imagery of plant growth, mountain ranges, storms, and forest fires. A solitary home is often set into these imagined spaces. The scenes Sorgman creates are meant to feel both playful yet perilous; dreamy yet uneasy. Throughout Sorgman’s body of work, there is a play between flatness, depth, and the simplification of complex forms. He builds up layers of paint through repetitive marks and symbols, and sees their accumulation as a reflection of his thoughts, feelings, and anxieties at the time of each individual work’s creation.

  • James Kane

    At its core, James' work is about intimacy. His sexual identity and personal relationships form a prism, through which the content of his paintings bend and refract as they examine intimacy between strangers. People on the street, the subway, and couples sharing private moments in public are all viewed from a queer stance to ask questions about loneliness, contact, and communication. By combining collected images and personal experiences, James creates composite sketches that repurpose the initial encounters captured in them.

  • Warner Ball

    Warner Ball is a Michigan-based artist and graduate of Albion College, where he graduated with a focus in photography. Warner is a curator, as well as an artist, and enjoys coordinating meaningful collections of work that explore important topics like climate and identity. He employs a number of media, including photography and sculpture, to explore queerness and domesticity, the major conceptual foundation of his work for the past few years.

  • Shyun Song

    Shyun's minimalism does the maximum in bringing out the intensity of shapes and colors. What seem like stable forms - rectangles, tubes, and lines - never sit quietly on the ground. Shyun tips these shapes on their corner, drops them over a shadow, and slices just a little of their edges like soft cheese, capturing the brief moment where the stability of geometry meets the imagination of our eyes.

  • Petra Nimtz

    My work develops from the physical process of painting. Compositions are not planned or created, but found; they emerge somewhere along the way. To me ,what matters, is the act of painting itself. Having no concept in mind frees me from rules, elements of style and formal techniques. Usually I start a new canvas with gestural mark making or shapes. Using brushes, palette knifes and rags the oil paint is applied thickly, building layers. One mark here leads to another over there. I work on more than one piece and so a conversation between the them begins. What I do on one canvas has an influence on the other and vice versa. A unique aspect of my painting process is the fact that I have trained myself only to use my left hand although I’m right handed. I’m using the left side right brain connection which is all about imagination and not controlling anything. My artwork is a way to express what I cannot say with words.

  • Camilla Webster

    Camilla Webster is not only a painter, but a best selling author and TED speaker whose creative enterprises have led her to success in many disciplines. Her artwork floats emotions and themes of current events in her emphatic abstractions. Camilla’s painterly style is guided by her previous work as a writer, evoking a narrative discourse within the textural lines of her body of work.

  • Joe Piscopia

    Joe Piscopia builds 3D shapes with 2D mediums. Informed by strongly contrasted lighting, Joe’s gradations bring every object, concept, or pattern to life in abstract forms. Shapes and colors document moments of thought and emotion in Joe’s life. Starting with a thought, a bird, or a single word, he intuitively explores from there into a realm of soft geometry.

  • Marco DaSilva

    Marco DaSilva is a Brazilian-American artist whose symbol-based works explore hybridity through the intersections of painting and craft. His graphic style of making combines painting and collaging of objects, textures and mediums. His works use bright bold colors that investigate ritual and storytelling through a queer lens. He creates his own mythology in the process, providing a richly saturated landscape of his own world to the viewer.

  • Seren Morey

    Seren Morey is a New York City based artist who makes sculptural paintings through extrusion, informed by quantum mechanics and fairy tales. Her biological/botanical hybrids reference the all-encompassing universality of particle energy.

  • Seema Lisa Pandya

    Seema Lisa Pandya is a Brooklyn based multidisciplinary artist and accomplished sustainability consultant who explores the intersection between sustainability, art, culture, and the built-environment with an aim of connecting audiences with an experiential awareness of nature and primordial forms. Her work ranges from sculptures made from recycled materials, public art, painting, photography, wood-working, light sculptures, and kinetic interactive sculptures.

  • Chloe Swopshire

    Tales of balance and color are told in Chloe Swopshire’s paintings, a scavenger hunt of gestures and emotions that lead to her self discovery and identity. The imagery in Chloe’s work teeters somewhere on the crest of chaos, tethered by experience and nearly cut loose by dreams. The self taught artist works in washes, editing and creating a figurative map of colorful emotion.

  • Kati Vilim

    Kati works from her Chelsea studio, serene and slightly aloof like her own paintings. It is easy to classify her as geometric abstraction, but she uses this style to a very specific end: to make “invisible things” visible. The subject of Kati’s work is abstraction itself and it is not a representation of anything that exists in the visible world. This gives the viewers the freedom to forget about preconceptions or contexts, and invites them to develop an independent, individual interpretation of the works. Aside from painting, she also works with digital mediums to make installations and videos.

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