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IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH

A benefit collection for LGBTQ+ Wellness

50% of our proceeds from this collection goes to  FOR THE GWORLS, a Black trans-led collective curating parties to raise funds for Black trans people's gender affirming surgery and rent.

50% of our proceeds from this collection goes to  FOR THE GWORLS, a Black trans-led collective curating parties to raise funds for Black trans people's gender affirming surgery and rent.

WARNER BALL

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MAKIKO HARRIS

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MARÍA ANTONIA VILLASEÑ...

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JAMES KANE

Don't Have Time For A ...

$920

MARÍA ANTONIA VILLASEÑOR ...

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TYLER SORGMAN

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JAMES KANE

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AMELIA GALGON

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MAKIKO HARRIS

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COLE RICHARD PUETZ

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WARNER BALL

Truvada and Lace

$370

PAUL ANAGNOSTOPOULOS

Don't Have Time For ...

$920

AMELIA GALGON

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JAMES KANE

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COLE RICHARD PUETZ

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TYLER SORGMAN

Safe House

$2,520

Healing From the Culture of Sickness

Original content

Marco DaSilva

Artist spotlight

Marco DaSilva

Artist spotlight

Artist, Performer, and Activist

Healing From The Culture of Sickness

SPECIAL

ALL WORKS BY PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

Eriko uses imagery, symbolism, and folklore to investigate the tension between their queer identity and Japanese heritage. With a rotating set of avatars, these icons act as anchors for conversations about perversion, desire, and the fetishism of bodies. They also serve as ways to honor women yokai and demons in Japanese folklore.

 

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Warner Ball has been working with photography, sculpture, and most recently, cyanotypes. Cyanotype itself is a nod to the blue hue of Truvada, a drug taken to reduce HIV transmission. By juxtaposing Truvada and condoms with domestic images like doilies and floral patterns, Warner hopes to reduce stigma surrounding queerness and sex.

 

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María Antonia uses traditional craft techniques like weaving, felting, and beading to channel their highly interactive process as a means to work through the fluctuating realities of a trans indigenous woman. By also incorporating found objects like milk cartons or googly eyes, she values being supported and surprised by her own materials as much as she does the looks of the final product.

 

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James’ work is about intimacy as a result of our need for connection and release. Especially ones in this collection depict people in private or vulnerable moments, revealing the tenuous coexistence between desire and obsession, risk and reward, conversations and apologies.

 

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Makiko’s abstract works explore the resilience of the human body. Through a physical painting process that includes trampling, burning, scraping, flooding, and staining - the durability of the painting surface is tested. The end results of a wrinkled, off-square canvas calls to mind how the skin on our bodies reflects our internal and external experiences through wrinkles, sags, and scars. Through a bold use of color and a leveraging of the wrinkled surface, the work celebrates resilience and beauty in imperfection.

 

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James’ interactive works invite viewers to become part of them through mirror reflection. When social distancing disconnects us from society and raises anxiety and depression, self-reflection helps us regulate our emotions and sync up with ourselves and others, he says.

 

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Amelia’s figure paintings challenge our culture’s projected understanding of queer individuals and their bisexual+ experiences. Using lived experience as a point of departure, she invites viewers into the space to engage with the body and notice how the playful relationship between the paint and the figure offers a nuanced representation of the subject.

 

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Tyler’s landscapes are symbols of the psychological. They place a solitary home among imagery of plants, mountains, storms, and fires that feels both embracing and threatening. The repetition of these motifs is itself a result of the artist’s thoughts, feelings, and anxieties at the time of each work’s creation.

 

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Cole’s depictions of the modern queer experience offer an access point into the subconscious mind of both artist and viewer. Objects and symbols within his work leave vague imprints of familiarity as if existing within a memory. Each buried, unseen detail unlocks a new door, revealing private, concealed thoughts and desires.

 

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Anthony’s collages tell stories within stories from the world that he finds overwhelming. But they are also secrets that are not always meant to be perceived. The journey of discovery viewers take thumbing through friendly gestures, appealing colors, or familiar images.

 

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After Katie’s father passed away from cancer, she started exploring the idea of the cell as full of life but also metastasis that is destructive. She expanded the two parallels to what we think of as dichotomies such as life and death, seduction and repulsion, microcosm and macrocosm.

 

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By reinterpreting ancient images and uniting them with visual material created between the Stonewall Riots of 1969 and the AIDS Crisis, Paul tells queer stories that have been historically erased through the lens of intimacy and desire. Ultimately the paintings are memorializing celebrations of tenderness and the tenacity in the queer community.

 

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