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The Space Between

The Space Between

"I often feel like I live life in the space between two worlds, walking a tightrope between opposite forces. Analytical & Creative. Passion & Indifference.  Dark & Light. This collection contains pieces that appeal to that sense of balance, and contrast. I like pieces that are bold, and dramatic, but also soft, and illusory. I usually hang artwork in clusters throughout my home, in odd-numbered groupings, with scattered placements. I move pieces around a lot, mixing up with groupings to give it a new feel."

Staff Picks by Paige

Preparing for (Black Site)...

$700

Agency

$88 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Blue Bird

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

Collected Memories #4

$88 /mo | $1,350 Purchase

Forces Beyond

$88 /mo | $1,600 Purchase

Griiddiro Mirror 1

$300

Nuf Said

$88 /mo | $800 Purchase

Rice

$148 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

The Middle One

$38 /mo | $1,600 Purchase

Untitled (CV 184)

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

Sun Collapse

$88 /mo | $2,400 Purchase

Light at the Ends...

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

Snippetree

$38 /mo | $2,200 Purchase

Indian Hands

$2,000

  • Christian Perdix

    Christian Perdix is a German Postwar & Contemporary artist who was born in 1987.

  • Ryan Sarah Murphy

    Ryan transforms the cardboards you may throw away without much thought into colorful architectural miniatures. Despite the playful variation in depth, form, and color, the parts in her reliefs magically fit together. Does that remind you of anything? I’m thinking New York City’s way of combining like 10 different eras in one block.

  • Sasha Hallock

    Sasha’s paintings are small but mighty. They sometimes look like fictional sculptures dropped onto the vacuum of vibrant color. Other times they’re like a clutter of found objects. In either case, disparate objects disappear in favor of a whole situation of motion and interaction, tinted with Sasha’s faith in the possibility of true harmony.

  • Sinejan Kılıç Buchina

    Sinejan’s mixed media paintings are an ode to the lived experiences of places that no article, photograph, or map can capture. Borders between two countries are never clear cut; languages become forgotten; some small towns cannot be reached by even mail, rendering it invisible. To parallel this constant process of unraveling, Sinejan erodes geographical boundaries on maps with stains of dirt, rust, spices, straw, and other materials collected from places she personally traveled to. She actually keeps glass jars of scrap metal on her studio cabinets that will one day turn into rust - a poetic process where even the most hardened, robust-looking materials eventually return to nature.

  • Rebecca Stern

    Rebecca has a MacGyver-like talent when it comes to painting, using a blend of different textures, patterns, colors, and handmade brushes to create her complex landscapes . Her work balances a hyper-intelligent sensitivity with a free flowing and spontaneous expression. If Rebecca’s paintings were school children, they’d be in the gifted and talented program (but then probably be kicked out a week later for using shortcuts to do long division).

  • Philippe Halaburda

    Philippe calls his paintings “geographical abstractions”. He reconstructs recognizable details of an urban environment (angular shapes that look like construction debris or suggestion of skyscrapers, for example) according to his personal impression of pecific locations like New York, Aix-en-Provence, and Zurich. But Philippe doesn’t try to organize everything - where everything is fast, noisy, smelly, and overall so extra-, you gotta lean into the chaos and learn how to enjoy it.

  • Molly Herman

    Expressive and vulnerable, Molly’s paintings read like an unpredictably eloquent dream journal. A cloudy haze of bright colors are expertly synthesized to evoke memories of a time and place which feel familiar, though ultimately unknown. As a skilled colorist, Molly creates abstract moments of nostalgia and sentimentality. Molly’s pieces are made up of experiences, both lived and imagined. She is able to capture small moments and transfer them onto canvas.

  • Shira Toren

    There is a sense of history in Shira's paintings. They are built up patiently like the hands of potters that their surfaces resemble, but left to be scratched and marked by some unknown force. Even the central objects are pressed into the thick layer of venetian plaster instead of sitting on top. In a world of polished surfaces, Shira's use of materials restores the power of time.

  • Kimmy Quillin

    Kimmy Quilin with her choppy bob haircut and a living room shrouded in warm clay colors, could be her own indie movie heroine. Underlying Kimmy’s study of colors and forms, whether in expressionistic strokes or recent minimalism, is a love and attention to things around her.

  • Max Manning

    Max Manning is an artist and educator who currently lives and works in Houston, Texas. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Two Dimensional Studies from Bowling Green State University in 2011 and his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati in 2014. Max has exhibited work nationally and internationally and is currently represented by TW Fine Art in Brisbane, Australia.

  • Ketta Ioannidou

    Although Ketta has worked in New York for a while now, the bleeding and blooming of colors in her oil paintings resemble the way water changes everything around it - perhaps the expanses of water that surround her home country Cyprus. Their ambient effect resembles memories as much as it does landscapes, ever moving and receding towards oblivion.

  • Adrienne Moumin

    Combining black and white photography and collage, Adrienne’s unique perspective uses urban backdrops to create abstract shapes. Hand-cut-and-assembled, her collages are anything but static, with texture and layering emphasizing their handmade quality. The complex, layered nature of Adrienne’s practice subtly blends fragmented photographs into geometric forms.

  • Ellannah Sadkin

    If pop art means anything to you, it’s like Ellanah absorbed the deluge of cartoons, graffiti, neon glitches on analog TVs, and movie characters - in a word, childhood in the 90’s - in a batter of cake that’s her own flavor. She’s not just a consumer though. Whether in circular canvas or a frame of botanical patterns, Ellanah constantly interrupts the coherence of mass media narratives by rearranging their elements.

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