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For The One Who Will Sleep Before Countdown

For The One Who Will Sleep Before Countdown

New Years Eve 2012, my family and I ended up going to bed at 10:50 PM. What’s better than dazzling fireworks, tangy champagne, and ear-banging loud cheers of countdown? Sleep, apparently.

Character card

Unf**kwithable  |  The cool older relative  vibes  | Marie Kondo folding 

They rejoice at the occasional heartfelt random interactions on the subway but feel the most rejuvenated within the presence of their own mind. Like the works in this collection, their conversations are steered by a rather complex subject matter. 

But no matter what -- there’s always that one person who has to get their full beauty sleep. And this collection is for them!

Untitled (CV 180)

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

She Works Hard for...

$900

Fragile Landscape 2

$350

Θεά μετά διαδήματος (Goddess...

$850

King

$38 /mo | $900 Purchase

Full Stop

$38 /mo | $750 Purchase

Scraped (3)

$38 /mo | $750 Purchase

America at Sea Series...

$38 /mo | $1,200 Purchase

Fall Flowers

$38 /mo | $1,200 Purchase

Structure

$38 /mo | $1,000 Purchase

Alba

$38 /mo | $650 Purchase

Wave Front

$88 /mo | $1,800 Purchase

Plaisir

$450 /mo | $450 Purchase

Bright Young People

$300

Untitled (CV 184)

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

Embryonic Stage 2

$38 /mo | $320 Purchase

Eruption

$38 /mo | $500 Purchase

Untitled (CV 173)

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

  • Max Manning

    Max Manning is an artist and educator who currently lives and works in Houston, Texas. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Two Dimensional Studies from Bowling Green State University in 2011 and his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati in 2014. Max has exhibited work nationally and internationally and is currently represented by TW Fine Art in Brisbane, Australia.

  • Christian Perdix

    Christian Perdix is a German Postwar & Contemporary artist who was born in 1987.

  • Claire McConaughy

    Claire McConaughy’s works are a combination of elements that make poetic moments connected to the present and past. Her paintings are reactions to the process of painting and the history of landscape. Using a combination of painted passages and fluidly drawn lines her process allows for a variety of marks and layering of imagery with shapes giving way to lines and interlacing of imagery. The layers and use of color in her paintings create spatial tensions and surprising metaphors. These works continue in the lineage of landscape painting, and also come from McConaughy’s early experiences in rural mountain woods and life in New York City.

  • Darryl Babatunde Smith

    Darryl is a classicist and polygot who brings his patience and virtue of slowness into art. His "classical" style is one tool for studying how the tiniest details of the human body conveys the person's reality and history. That's why, Darryl says, he is able to find resonances between his own life and imageries from Ancient Greece that existed many millenia ago: his favorites include Dionysian myth, violence, and wine.

  • Sasha Hallock

    Sasha’s paintings are small but mighty. They sometimes look like fictional sculptures dropped onto the vacuum of vibrant color. Other times they’re like a clutter of found objects. In either case, disparate objects disappear in favor of a whole situation of motion and interaction, tinted with Sasha’s faith in the possibility of true harmony.

  • Troy Medinis

    A video and book artist-turned-painter, Troy still hasn't lost the wonder of new materials like toys, molding paste, and most recently flower-patterned plastic bags. Rather than playing fixed roles in a prefabricated play, his works together explore a constellation of loosely related sentiments like serious absurdity, the ineffable scale of cosmic time, surveyor marks, and rat traps around New York. These moments when existential issues suddenly intrude into everyday life or vice versa are most pronounced in the contrast between the digital hot pink he frequents and the scratched, worn out textures like peeled subway ads that accompany it.

  • Camilla Webster

    Camilla Webster is not only a painter, but a best selling author and TED speaker whose creative enterprises have led her to success in many disciplines. Her artwork floats emotions and themes of current events in her emphatic abstractions. Camilla’s painterly style is guided by her previous work as a writer, evoking a narrative discourse within the textural lines of her body of work.

  • Takashi Harada

    Nature and geography have something in common: their boundaries are put in place by humans and are all but made up. Takashi Harada dissolves these natural and geographical boundaries in his artwork. For Takashi, all natural things have a common and equal value. When in nature, he believes, you connect back to it one atom at a time. Born in Japan, Takashi’s international existence made him face his Japanese identity as well his identity within the natural world. His art reflects that feeling, blurring natural light and color in ethereal paintings that merge harsh divisions and avoid representation in favor of capturing feeling.

  • Jacqueline Ferrante

    Jacqueline Ferrante is a painter based in New York and Italy. She was raised in Long Island, NY, and earned her Bachelor's degree in Art and Theater from Northeastern University. Her work has been exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. She has completed residencies in New York, Ireland, and Italy.

  • Beth Barry

    Speaking of the subtle ways environment affects a painter’s color choices, Beth’s choices scream East Coast. From the thick of acrylic paint emerges Beth’s impression of landscapes, styles alternating between abstract waves and naturalistic scenery.

  • Gauthier Denoyelle

    Everyone seems to be learning coding now, but it takes a deeply invested one to know the beauty of everything suddenly lining up towards a solution. That moment when a highly elaborate system starts to makes sense is what Gauthier's small drawings feel like. Having studied and worked in data science, his works don't mimic scientific concept - they ARE. But instead of arguing to be completely abstract concepts, they also trace the time and effort taken to reach them, in faint pencil lines, little notes, and the blotted look of marker and crayon.

  • Joseph O'Neal

    Joseph's work creates seams by coupling non-objective imagery with written texts such as dates, names, and various words and phrases. The back and forth between the two elements pose an ambiguous field of opportunities for the viewer to exist. Urgency and chance are ever-present in the works as is the dirt on the road to conclusion.

  • Johanna Ryan

    What if we saw nature not as distinguishable things like trees, mountains, and soil, but as a cloud of influences that surround us? Harkening back to her memories growing up in nature and a personal interest in Ecofeminism, Johanna's method of printmaking is in itself a dialogue with nature. In cyanotypes, the intentional outlines of base drawings intermingle with spontaneous factors like the angle, brightness, and hue of sunlight - even the canvas it is printed on is candidly frayed at the edges. In her other prints also, watercolor-like effects make even the ground appear buoyant.

  • Noriko Okada

    Noriko Okada’s works are like siblings who look nothing alike. They’re like third cousins; like twins separated at birth; like people who you could have sworn were only children: each work is singular, but is related by a thread that runs deep yet just out of sight. Her amalgamous artworks of paint, fabric, prints, and ceramic don’t shout their message out loud, but invite viewers in for a chat.

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