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Sustainability with: Basia Goszczynska Sustainability with: Basia Goszczynska

Sustainability with: Basia Goszczynska

Basia Goszczynska is a Brooklyn based artist who explores environmental and waste issues through a variety of mediums including sculpture, installation, performance, social practice and new media.  

In Flux

$1,200

Indian Hands

$2,000

The Rise and Fall...

$348 /mo | $6,000 Purchase

Salmon Fillet

$1,800

Spoils, installation and c-print series, 2017

Sally Dreams

$348 /mo | $4,500 Purchase

Expulsion

$148 /mo | $3,800 Purchase

Shelter means a safe...

$38 /mo | $600 Purchase

Good Germs

$88 /mo | $2,800 Purchase
LET'S TALK ABOUT

What Inspired This Collection?

"By inviting people to consider our relationship with our environment as a fragile balancing act, I hope to encourage a level of caution and sensitivity in the debates that these work provokes. "

Rainbow Cave, installation view, salvaged plastic bags, salvaged fishing nets, LED lights, 2019-2020

River Rats

$88 /mo | $3,500 Purchase

Still Holding On

$148 /mo | $4,800 Purchase

Swamp Reflections II

$38 /mo | $2,500 Purchase

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

  • Winnie Sidharta

    In the age of migration and multicultural families, no one has to be one thing - Winnie straddles three countries of Indonesia, China, and the U.S where she worked as educator as well as artist. In her mixed-media works, tropical and botanical motifs are not relegated as an exotic backdrop but intermingle with human bodies. Some motifs are more pronounced, like figures sitting in the position of or making hand gestures of Buddha. But Winnie's playful collage uses these pieces to resist the sense of a fixed origin, fully giving in celebrating rather than resisting the confusions of having multitudinous identities.

  • Ellannah Sadkin

    If pop art means anything to you, it’s like Ellanah absorbed the deluge of cartoons, graffiti, neon glitches on analog TVs, and movie characters - in a word, childhood in the 90’s - in a batter of cake that’s her own flavor. She’s not just a consumer though. Whether in circular canvas or a frame of botanical patterns, Ellanah constantly interrupts the coherence of mass media narratives by rearranging their elements.

  • Lauren Matsumoto

    Lauren is a painter who straddles the best of both worlds: collage and painting; abstract backgrounds like East Asian inkwash paintings and naturalistic renderings straight out of encyclopedias; patterns and depth. The birds perch where we yield space for them, living precariously among manmade contraptions.

  • Amy Hughes

    What do a juicy fillet of salmon and a body half-submerged in bath water have in common? Through soft-colored, naturalistic paintings, Amy explores the beauty of female bodies in everyday life - the beauty of vulnerable, soft flesh itself safe from the glare of cameras and gloss of magazine pages.

  • Elody Gyekis

    Fairytales exist everywhere people have desires and dreams - and Elody is ready to listen to it. They may take the form of more traditional iconography like dragons and damsels, or something specific to the modern city like ghostly, faceless figures in the crowd. Both ways yield the view of human bodies as they are molded by images projected onto them by ourselves and by others.

  • Katie Hector

    Katie’s mixed-media paintings burst out from two-dimensional space in smears of concrete and swirls of neon color. After the first three seconds of trying to identify an object and failing, you’ll be inclined to smell, touch, and listen to these sites left behind by some mysterious encounter. Are the two circular marks in Katie’s FOMO series dinosaur footprints or the result of someone angrily punching at a slab of clay (my friend who makes ceramics does this…)? Prehistoric or Gen-Z? Wild moss or silica gel beads? Pools of magma or ketchup and mustard? You tell me.

  • Sasha Hallock

    Sasha’s paintings are small but mighty. They sometimes look like fictional sculptures dropped onto the vacuum of vibrant color. Other times they’re like a clutter of found objects. In either case, disparate objects disappear in favor of a whole situation of motion and interaction, tinted with Sasha’s faith in the possibility of true harmony.

  • Ryan Patrick Martin

    Painter, sculptor, and musician Ryan Patrick Martin is one of those rare people who creates his own reality - one of playfully strange objects and environments. His works are often informed by an interest in sound synthesis, movement, vibrancy, multi-sensory experiences and an endless search to find humor and harmony in the slop.

  • Jen Hitchings

    In a world that creates shiny new things just so they can go obsolete, Jen discovers old, abandoned, or neglected things gone sinister. Throughout works that vary in palette from rainbow neons to worn out neutrals, from panoramic scenes of lake gatherings to close-ups of fences, there shouldn't be anything outwardly unsettling. If anything, Jen's use of fine lines and matter-of-fact realism inspired by photography should make these objects familiar. But the unsettling effect arises from finally facing these usually unseen, even deprecated, things - we had forgotten them so profoundly that there is no way to make sense of them.

  • Christina Massey

    Christina's mixed-media works are engaged in a perpetual struggle to burst out of whatever shape that holds them together. A philosopher once said that any artwork is a battle between material and content - this cannot be truer when Christina uses fabric like khakis, linen, and yarn that usually function to clothe and decorate our bodies but in her works given freedom to emanate energy on their own. In a sense, her approach seems like a rebellion against the way we in the modern times tend to bend nature as an object of our own use. When given the smallest crevice, nature will re-emerge in its full majestic force.

  • Caetlynn Booth

    The swarms of technicolor lined up on Caetlynn's palette are hard to believe came from mixing paint. The cool neon violet, for example, looks like it has been like that forever, made up of a material halfway between mud and clouds. Combined with her ways of boldly cutting landscape with geometry, her paintings become a vision from eyes shaped by digital environments - she has a special interest in mirroring and repetition in particular. As recognizable objects slowly disappear with such modulations, what remains is a sense of transcendence that does not relinquish joy.

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