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Artworks for the Organic Modern Interiors

Artworks for the Organic Modern Interiors

Cricket Crest

$1,950 /mo | $1,950 Purchase

Folded In

$148 /mo | $2,800 Purchase

Bergy Bits

$88 /mo | $1,950 Purchase

As a breaking open...

$500 /mo | $500 Purchase

Global Warning

$88 /mo | $2,500 Purchase

Even though we are...

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

My Sullen Childhood

$38 /mo | $1,200 Purchase

Blue Diamond Transistor

$88 /mo | $2,500 Purchase

Dreams of Kyushu

$38 /mo | $450 Purchase

The Slicksters

$38 /mo | $1,000 Purchase

Fantastic

$38 /mo | $2,100 Purchase

Inside Curve

$148 /mo | $2,200 Purchase

A memorial for Atatiana...

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

Bracing Practice

$88 /mo | $1,200 Purchase

Hunch

$88 /mo | $1,950 Purchase

Pareidolia

$88 /mo | $950 Purchase

Natalus

$88 /mo | $2,000 Purchase

Þórdís

$148 /mo | $2,500 Purchase

  • Debbi Kenote

    Debbi's works are sneaky in a sense that, instead of denying the existence of a frame, they subtly push against and peak out from it (have you noticed the pairs of eyes in some of her paintings?) Neat square pieces on the outer boundaries of the frame devolve into patterns, curves, and patches of sprayed paint. Some of Debbi's paintings actually look like puzzles, challenging you to play an active role - only to reveal that, in the end, her puzzles yield fun for the sake of it rather than a finished picture.

  • Jenny Kemp

    Jenny Kemp's lines don't try too hard to mark where one object ends and another begins. Instead, they take the lead in playfully guiding the viewer's eyes around the page, sometimes literally in spirals. If you follow closely, you'll start seeing layers that have you look into the piece beyond surface level. And her color choices have an earthy quality that is almost nostalgic - orange is always in fashion, right?

  • Weihui Lu

    Weihui is a painter whose work explores the themes of mental health, climate change, and the ways in which identities - both cultural and personal - are created through the narratives we imagine and retell. She was born in Shanghai, China and grew up in Queens, NY, where she currently lives and works.

  • Cavier Coleman

    Cavier works in oil paint, music, installations, photography, and graphic design, using high contrast bold lines and vibrant color schemes. His love of the arts kicked off during his international modeling career, where he took an interest in photography. Soon, bright colors and boldness began to envelop clever commentary hidden within the saturated layers. His influences are Pablo Picasso and Jean Michael Basquiat, but his art it always uniquely “Cavier”. This originality has led him to be involved in projects such as magazine covers, galleries showcases, ad campaigns, art shows, store displays, and more. Always innovating, he continues towards his goal of becoming a household name.

  • Cat Gunn

    Originally from Baltimore, Cat Gunn (they/them/theirs) is an artist living and working in San Diego who identifies as non-binary transgender and queer. They create abstract paintings with layers of oil paints and mediums built up over time, using a variety of techniques to manipulate the alchemy of the paint.

  • Joe Piscopia

    Joe Piscopia builds 3D shapes with 2D mediums. Informed by strongly contrasted lighting, Joe’s gradations bring every object, concept, or pattern to life in abstract forms. Shapes and colors document moments of thought and emotion in Joe’s life. Starting with a thought, a bird, or a single word, he intuitively explores from there into a realm of soft geometry.

  • Robin Kang

    Robin Kang is a Brooklyn-based artist, educator, and student of ancient mystical lineages. Her art reinterprets the tradition of weaving within a contemporary technological context. Utilizing a digitally operated Jacquard hand loom, the contemporary version of the first binary operated machine and argued precursor to the invention of the computer, she hand weaves tapestries that combine mythic symbolism, computer related imagery, and digital mark making. The juxtaposition of textiles with electronics opens conversations of reconciling old traditions with new possibilities, as well as the relationship between textiles, symbols, language, memory and spirituality.

  • Liz Ainslie

    Liz's compositions in oil look like they are made of different materials - yarn, water, dirt, grass, and is that colored paper? It's what we imagine amoeba playgrounds look like, one we could jump on a field trip in an episode of Magic School Bus. Although there is nothing "realistic" per se, you will notice little traces of movement left behind by inhabitants of this world in droplets, hatched marks, fuzzy lines, and repeating waves. Read more from our interview with Liz

  • Sasha Hallock

    Sasha’s paintings are small but mighty. They sometimes look like fictional sculptures dropped onto the vacuum of vibrant color. Other times they’re like a clutter of found objects. In either case, disparate objects disappear in favor of a whole situation of motion and interaction, tinted with Sasha’s faith in the possibility of true harmony.

  • Evan Ishmael

    Evan works from his studio in East Williamsburg, the back wall neatly lined with tools and the slightly sour smell of wood in the air. Considering his sculpture and design background, his command of unusual materials like soot residue, concrete, and spray doesn’t come as a surprise. But you may be surprised when his minimal, even digital looking, compositions start to unfold in poetic layers-- “bracing practice” indeed.

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