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Underground Undergrowth

Underground Undergrowth

What I see when I hear the word “rubble”. My love of moss (on rocks, trees, grout lines in tiles). What I dreamed I could dig up from my backyard when I was seven. These snippets of memory and fantasy build from my experience with the bizarre overlap in nature and infrastructure in suburbia. I took inspiration for this collection from snapshots from my memory of the overlooked undergrowth. Fairy rings in mulched over medians, bits of gravel with neon paint mysteriously on the corners, and my esteemed childhood collection of fanciful woodchip shapes are just a few of the nostalgia ridden images that bring these works together.


"Works that call on my memories and idealizations of the overgrown corners I rooted around in my childhood."

- Curina Staff, Katie


The Colors of the...

$485

Untitled (CV 185)

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

Orange Thread

$88 /mo | $900 Purchase

Joyful reunion in springtime

$38 /mo | $900 Purchase

Moldy Bathroom Reflections

$88 /mo | $2,600 Purchase

In The Shadow

$38 /mo | $400 Purchase

Tough Love

$600

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