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Shedding light on what prefers to stay in the dark

Shedding light on what prefers to stay in the dark

Shedding light on the works that prefers to stay in the dark: "I like works that have a harsher context to it and are on the bleaker side for the color scheme.  I think this collection reflects the thoughts of the viewer back on them, because the viewer projects their own interpretations onto the pieces.  I like the openness of meaning and that it opens the door to conversation. "

Staff Picks by Devon

Now It Sees Itself

$88 /mo | $600 Purchase

Certain Dark Things #82

$348 /mo | $5,000 Purchase

Names (Bones)

$38 /mo | $750 Purchase

Gestural Pouring #7

$500

May Save Teeth

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

Center Curves Squared

$88 /mo | $1,200 Purchase

Tough Love

$600

We Go Walking Late...

$88 /mo | $700 Purchase

Midnight One

$88 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Light at the Ends...

$38 /mo | $800 Purchase

Deep Sensations

$88 /mo | $425 Purchase

Certain Dark Things #84

$88 /mo | $3,200 Purchase

Spreads

$88 /mo | $600 Purchase

Untitled (White Painting 18-04)

$38 /mo | $425 Purchase

Jam Page 1

$1,200

  • Brittany Kieler

    An oscillator is a circuit that produces a repeated alternating waveform by converting electronic signals. Simply put, they generate and convey information, a theme that Brittany Kieler explores the limits of in her art as she delves into the inherent mysticism of human history. Electronics (or anything having to do with oscillators themselves) don't appear in her work at all, but her wavy line art is reminiscent of what one sounds like... if that oscillator became sentient and tried to teach philosophy. Waveform next to waveform, her black and white lithographic lines meld into organic shapes that are almost familiar (and some that are not).

  • Sarah Dineen

    Sarah Dineen holds a BFA from Montserrat College of Art and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York. She has exhibited internationally and has been featured in art publications including Hyperallergic and New American Paintings.

  • Troy Medinis

    A video and book artist-turned-painter, Troy still hasn't lost the wonder of new materials like toys, molding paste, and most recently flower-patterned plastic bags. Rather than playing fixed roles in a prefabricated play, his works together explore a constellation of loosely related sentiments like serious absurdity, the ineffable scale of cosmic time, surveyor marks, and rat traps around New York. These moments when existential issues suddenly intrude into everyday life or vice versa are most pronounced in the contrast between the digital hot pink he frequents and the scratched, worn out textures like peeled subway ads that accompany it.

  • Eric Jiaju Lee

    Eric Jiaju Lee does a little bit of everything. He's an abstract painter, musician, sculptor, photographer, performance artist, and rock climber. It is no surprise, then, that his nature-inspired paintings are informed by movement. The fluid calligraphic gestures of Chinese ink and brush and tai chi can be seen in his abstract works as he pours, puddles, and tips his way towards representing the feeling of nature.

  • Evan Ishmael

    Evan works from his studio in East Williamsburg, the back wall neatly lined with tools and the slightly sour smell of wood in the air. Considering his sculpture and design background, his command of unusual materials like soot residue, concrete, and spray doesn’t come as a surprise. But you may be surprised when his minimal, even digital looking, compositions start to unfold in poetic layers-- “bracing practice” indeed.

  • Adrienne Moumin

    Combining black and white photography and collage, Adrienne’s unique perspective uses urban backdrops to create abstract shapes. Hand-cut-and-assembled, her collages are anything but static, with texture and layering emphasizing their handmade quality. The complex, layered nature of Adrienne’s practice subtly blends fragmented photographs into geometric forms.

  • Jen Hitchings

    In a world that creates shiny new things just so they can go obsolete, Jen discovers old, abandoned, or neglected things gone sinister. Throughout works that vary in palette from rainbow neons to worn out neutrals, from panoramic scenes of lake gatherings to close-ups of fences, there shouldn't be anything outwardly unsettling. If anything, Jen's use of fine lines and matter-of-fact realism inspired by photography should make these objects familiar. But the unsettling effect arises from finally facing these usually unseen, even deprecated, things - we had forgotten them so profoundly that there is no way to make sense of them.

  • Johanna Ryan

    What if we saw nature not as distinguishable things like trees, mountains, and soil, but as a cloud of influences that surround us? Harkening back to her memories growing up in nature and a personal interest in Ecofeminism, Johanna's method of printmaking is in itself a dialogue with nature. In cyanotypes, the intentional outlines of base drawings intermingle with spontaneous factors like the angle, brightness, and hue of sunlight - even the canvas it is printed on is candidly frayed at the edges. In her other prints also, watercolor-like effects make even the ground appear buoyant.

  • Shira Toren

    There is a sense of history in Shira's paintings. They are built up patiently like the hands of potters that their surfaces resemble, but left to be scratched and marked by some unknown force. Even the central objects are pressed into the thick layer of venetian plaster instead of sitting on top. In a world of polished surfaces, Shira's use of materials restores the power of time.

  • Jacqueline Ferrante

    Jacqueline Ferrante is a painter based in New York and Italy. She was raised in Long Island, NY, and earned her Bachelor's degree in Art and Theater from Northeastern University. Her work has been exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. She has completed residencies in New York, Ireland, and Italy.

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