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The Platform

The Platform

The Platform is the punch in the stomach you feel the moment you go down the top of a roller coaster. It’s a painfully good ride, but also a short one. There is no climax within but the whole movie itself is one giant climax. Plus, it’s in Spanish. I hope this collection brings you that horrendous gut-wrenching feeling that I’m talking about.

This is a series staff picks by Undram

Names (Bones)

$38 /mo | $750 Purchase

Moldy Bathroom Reflections

$88 /mo | $2,600 Purchase

Glory Hole

$38 /mo | $1,400 Purchase

Red Loop

$88 /mo | $1,000 Purchase

Red Theo Butter

$88 /mo | $5,100 Purchase

White Boats

$148 /mo | $4,000 Purchase

5 Eggslike

$2,000

Red Splash

$38 /mo | $400 Purchase

  • Troy Medinis

    A video and book artist-turned-painter, Troy still hasn't lost the wonder of new materials like toys, molding paste, and most recently flower-patterned plastic bags. Rather than playing fixed roles in a prefabricated play, his works together explore a constellation of loosely related sentiments like serious absurdity, the ineffable scale of cosmic time, surveyor marks, and rat traps around New York. These moments when existential issues suddenly intrude into everyday life or vice versa are most pronounced in the contrast between the digital hot pink he frequents and the scratched, worn out textures like peeled subway ads that accompany it.

  • Ryan Patrick Martin

    Painter, sculptor, and musician Ryan Patrick Martin is one of those rare people who creates his own reality - one of playfully strange objects and environments. His works are often informed by an interest in sound synthesis, movement, vibrancy, multi-sensory experiences and an endless search to find humor and harmony in the slop.

  • Jen Hitchings

    In a world that creates shiny new things just so they can go obsolete, Jen discovers old, abandoned, or neglected things gone sinister. Throughout works that vary in palette from rainbow neons to worn out neutrals, from panoramic scenes of lake gatherings to close-ups of fences, there shouldn't be anything outwardly unsettling. If anything, Jen's use of fine lines and matter-of-fact realism inspired by photography should make these objects familiar. But the unsettling effect arises from finally facing these usually unseen, even deprecated, things - we had forgotten them so profoundly that there is no way to make sense of them.

  • Shira Toren

    There is a sense of history in Shira's paintings. They are built up patiently like the hands of potters that their surfaces resemble, but left to be scratched and marked by some unknown force. Even the central objects are pressed into the thick layer of venetian plaster instead of sitting on top. In a world of polished surfaces, Shira's use of materials restores the power of time.

  • Philippe Halaburda

    Philippe calls his paintings “geographical abstractions”. He reconstructs recognizable details of an urban environment (angular shapes that look like construction debris or suggestion of skyscrapers, for example) according to his personal impression of pecific locations like New York, Aix-en-Provence, and Zurich. But Philippe doesn’t try to organize everything - where everything is fast, noisy, smelly, and overall so extra-, you gotta lean into the chaos and learn how to enjoy it.

  • Jacqueline Ferrante

    Jacqueline Ferrante is a painter based in New York and Italy. She was raised in Long Island, NY, and earned her Bachelor's degree in Art and Theater from Northeastern University. Her work has been exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. She has completed residencies in New York, Ireland, and Italy.

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