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Mentos Mentos

Mentos

The Mentos collection emphasizes the courage to love oneself. Maybe you’re hard on the outside but a softy within. Or maybe you fizz up and explode when life comes at you too hard. But none of that really matters. Whatever others put on you is meaningless when you know who you are. So what if I look unique? So what if I have a non-stereotypical personality? 

It's All Good

$88 /mo | $1,200 Purchase

Spectra VI

$148 /mo | $3,000 Purchase

Traces

$38 /mo | $450 Purchase

Impressions of Light 3

$88 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Hard shelled soft chewy candy

Expulsion

$148 /mo | $3,800 Purchase

Eruption

$38 /mo | $500 Purchase

Crossing Paths

$38 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Expectations

$88 /mo | $1,200 Purchase
LET'S TALK ABOUT

What Inspired This Collection?

You have the right to express and promote the love for YOU. You deserve it, no matter which flavor you are. 

Courtesy of NPR.org

You Said You Were...

$348 /mo | $4,500 Purchase

Study for Spiritual Interpretation...

$148 /mo | $850 Purchase

WP + E3 +...

$38 /mo | $1,650 Purchase

Westside Highway

$148 /mo | $4,800 Purchase

Orange Bending into Yellow

$88 /mo | $1,500 Purchase

Still Holding On

$148 /mo | $4,800 Purchase

Buttoned-up

$38 /mo | $400 Purchase

Clavicle

$88 /mo | $750 Purchase

Marrow

$38 /mo | $450 Purchase

Amber Painting

$38 /mo | $220 Purchase

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

  • Katie Hector

    Katie’s mixed-media paintings burst out from two-dimensional space in smears of concrete and swirls of neon color. After the first three seconds of trying to identify an object and failing, you’ll be inclined to smell, touch, and listen to these sites left behind by some mysterious encounter. Are the two circular marks in Katie’s FOMO series dinosaur footprints or the result of someone angrily punching at a slab of clay (my friend who makes ceramics does this…)? Prehistoric or Gen-Z? Wild moss or silica gel beads? Pools of magma or ketchup and mustard? You tell me.

  • Paola Gracey

    What happens when you mix science and art? According to Paola Gracey they are one and the same, and the only mixing is that of her paints as she pours, dripts, tips, and swirls together experimental combinations. Her style is the result of her background in science and exposure to art, resulting in paintings packed with reactions, suspensions, flow patterns, and chemical equations that Paola has taken the care to record notes on. Though science may rely on replicability, Paola’s artwork is truly one of a kind.

  • Jacqueline Ferrante

    Jacqueline's work stems from her acute fascination with surfaces often overlooked in our natural and urban environments. With the use of paint, concrete and other building materials, she creates abstract, sculptural paintings that mimic these surfaces and call up nostalgia, ephemera, and the dichotomy between beauty and imperfection. Her paintings rely on themselves - on time and all the elements taking hold of them.

  • Jadie Meprivert

    In her work and in her life, Jadie strives to educate, inspire, and uplift others. Her work reflects her passion for fostering human relations and connection, inspired by connections made not only through her pursuit of visual art but through dance and her work as a vocalist and actor. Jadie’s loose, colorful brushstroke places those concepts on canvas, creating warm imagery that links to the divine and human nature as a whole.

  • Noriko Okada

    Noriko Okada’s works are like siblings who look nothing alike. They’re like third cousins; like twins separated at birth; like people who you could have sworn were only children: each work is singular, but is related by a thread that runs deep yet just out of sight. Her amalgamous artworks of paint, fabric, prints, and ceramic don’t shout their message out loud, but invite viewers in for a chat.

  • Winnie Sidharta

    In the age of migration and multicultural families, no one has to be one thing - Winnie straddles three countries of Indonesia, China, and the U.S where she worked as educator as well as artist. In her mixed-media works, tropical and botanical motifs are not relegated as an exotic backdrop but intermingle with human bodies. Some motifs are more pronounced, like figures sitting in the position of or making hand gestures of Buddha. But Winnie's playful collage uses these pieces to resist the sense of a fixed origin, fully giving in celebrating rather than resisting the confusions of having multitudinous identities.

  • Esteban Jimenez Guerra

    History always has a funny way of catching up to us, Guerra seems to make sure of that. The historical context that he intimately experienced in Cuba and in the diversity of New York City is mixed with the now, giving the viewers the constant message that liberation starts from the body. Gender stereotypes along with racial stereotypes that are perpetuated by long standing societal structures are also taken for a fresh spin, while playing with its past meanings.

  • Gabriella Moreno

    Have you ever looked at a portrait and felt as if it was looking right back at you? Gabriella Moreno explores this power dynamic, not through piercing eye contact, but through reclining nudes and unconventional materials that question negotiations of power in sexual contexts. Femme central subjects are painted on silk and satin instead of the traditional canvas. Materials used for bedding and clothing combine the potential intimacy of their traditional uses with poses that empower the sitter. In her paintings, strength and softness induce each other and reflect back on you through the sheen of the stretched silk and satin.

  • Renee Phillips

    As a process-based artist inspired by Earths ever-changing surface tensions, Renee explores the manipulation of paint, and layering of color, to achieve sculptural like results that droop, ripple, crack and pool on the canvas. Further engaging the elements of heat, wind, water and gravity, she pushes paint to its limit, allowing each color to display its individual ‘signature effect’, which is studied, layered and re-worked to reveal highly tactile and seductive surfaces that characterize her contemporary color field paintings.

  • Saskia Fleishman

    Is there something prophetic about Saskia Fleishman's name? Because...pardon us for the terrible pun but her landscapes are fully fleshy. In a twist of fate, fluid and ethereal things like cloud or waves of the sea have been built up with sand, while backgrounds of striking techicolor recede away from the material world.

  • Christina Massey

    Christina's mixed-media works are engaged in a perpetual struggle to burst out of whatever shape that holds them together. A philosopher once said that any artwork is a battle between material and content - this cannot be truer when Christina uses fabric like khakis, linen, and yarn that usually function to clothe and decorate our bodies but in her works given freedom to emanate energy on their own. In a sense, her approach seems like a rebellion against the way we in the modern times tend to bend nature as an object of our own use. When given the smallest crevice, nature will re-emerge in its full majestic force.

  • Hanna Washburn

    Hanna Washburn’s soft sculptures sag and bulge in shapes that reference human anatomy. Their plush forms grow almost organically from clothing, furniture, and found objects. Hanna’s work is focused on associations; the materials she uses come from objects with previous stories told in fabrics that come from domestic interiors (upholstery, gingham table cloths, curtains) and the sculptures she creates blend the feminine, grotesque, maternal, modest, and sexual.

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